So, following the last post here’s a quick overview on how to write in the Pandoc styled markdown that’s so useful for academic writing. So, without further ado here’s a run-down.

Writing **bold** and *italics* is as easy as adding 
asterisks like this, one for italic and two for bold. Hyphens 
in succession are converted either into an en-dash -- or an 
em-dash --- . Citations are also extremely easy -- just put 
the citation key (see the last post for how to configure 
this in Zotero) in square brackets, page numbers are optional, 
and go after a comma like in any other bracketed citation. 
There's more details in the Pandoc manual.[@macfarlane2014]

For a new paragraph you just leave a blank line. You can 
let text wrap on its own or
wrap it manually
which will all end up as 
the same paragraph, unless a blank line is left.
This can be useful for making sure that your text will 
always have a sensible line length even if your editor 
doesn't wrap the text.

Headings begin and end with a hash, and get 
smaller with every hash up to five hashes. 

# Like this #

## And this ##

### And this. ###


Pandoc has support for both "blockquotes" and "lineblocks" 
-- these are very similar, except that the former will let 
the text run on as standard (i.e. for prose) and the latter 
will preserve any lineation (i.e. for poetry). They look like this:

> This is a block quote, as you can see the text will 
> just run on until it reaches the end of the 
> line in whatever output format you have chosen. 

| Whereas a line
| block will make sure
|
| that your text is
| spaced as it is written.

>| You can use both of these
>|          together
>| To indent your delineated quotation.


Finally if you need to escape any formatting for 
whatever reason and have your text displayed exactly 
as it is, you can escape by using three backticks like this: 
 ```
Some escaped text. No styling will apply to this and *all* 
**symbols** will appear as they are written.
 ```

This whole block of text is inside such a verbatim block, 
and the output is below.

Writing bold and italics is as easy as adding asterisks like this, one for italic and two for bold. Hyphens in succession are converted either into an en-dash – or an em-dash — . Citations are also extremely easy – just put the citation key (see the last post for how to configure this in Zotero) in square brackets, page numbers are optional, and go after a comma like in any other bracketed citation. There’s more details in the Pandoc manual.1

For a new paragraph you just leave a blank line. You can let text wrap on its own or wrap it manually which will all end up as the same paragraph, unless a blank line is left. This can be useful for making sure that your text will always have a sensible line length even if your editor doesn’t wrap the text.

Headings begin and end with a hash, and get smaller with every hash up to five hashes.

Like this

And this

And this.

Pandoc has support for both “blockquotes” and “lineblocks” – these are very similar, except that the former will let the text run on as standard (i.e. for prose) and the latter will preserve any lineation (i.e. for poetry). They look like this:

This is a block quote, as you can see the text will just run on until it reaches the end of the line in whatever output format you have chosen.

Whereas a line
block will make sure

that your text is
spaced as it is written.

You can use both of these
         together
To indent your delineated quotation.

Finally if you need to escape any formatting for whatever reason and have your text displayed exactly as it is, you can escape by using three backticks like this:

Some escaped text. No styling will apply to this and *all* 
**symbols** will appear as they are written.

Pandoc can also create great pdfs of documents – very useful for articles!


References

MacFarlane, John, ‘Pandoc User Manual’, 2015 <http://pandoc.org/README.html>.


  1. John MacFarlane, ‘Pandoc User Manual’, 2015 <http://pandoc.org/README.html>.